Friday, August 28, 2015

Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Moderator's four Questions


"Bayo I must comment that your vehement defence of Tinubu portray you in the light of a tribalist."
                                                                                                                     ...........Ofure Aito


Where do I even begin to address the monumental ignorance packed in this sentence? Is Tinubu now synonymous with Yoruba interests?
Bayo Amos (a Yoruba) vehemently defends Bola Tinubu( a Yoruba), therefore Bayo Amos must be a tribalist???? Laughable.
If it is not white, must it only be black? So, as a Yoruba I must either criticize Tinubu or keep mute to escape being portrayed a tribalist? And if a Yoruba criticizes Tinubu, he or she must be a 'detribalised' nationalist? 

Does it now mean if an Igbo or a Kanuri attacks Tinubu,  he or she is attacking the Yoruba? 

You have a responsibility to be intelligent.

Thanks,
Bayo.

On Thu, Aug 27, 2015 at 6:47 PM, Ofure Aito <ofureaito@gmail.com> wrote:
Let us be honest, what we have here is a failure of leadership and rank dishonesty on the part of the vast majority of Yoruba intellectuals on this forum and elsewhere. Did you not read Niyi Osundare's cheesy poems in honor of the ongoing mayhem called #Change? Professot Gbadegesin called Tinubu a man of honor. Come on. The Yoruba on this forum have been dancing themselves silly for self-serving reasons. Many people have refused to drink their Kool Aid. There is so much this forum could have done to force accountability, no the Yorubas embraced crooks and criminals chanting #Change all the way to the bank. The joke is on them. No, the joke is on us for allowing their perfidy.

I do not subscribe to that view. Rather, my view is that yorubas have really subject the leaders to public scrutiny for their perfidious acts more that any other tribal group in the discourse of Nigerian political debates. We all know other leaders from Igbo and Hausa ethnic groups without mentioning their names and their acts of treason. Having said that I do agree that politics is a tribal game that requires tribal approval and platform for national relevance.. whatever that relevance is....?

Bayo I must comment that your vehement defence of Tinubu portray you inthe light of a tribalist. However, everyone has the freedom of expression and ideology....

Going back to Prof Falola's four point comments: my first take is that we all, especially, Nigerians are first tutored in tribal ideology and/or sentiments and thereafter, groomed in critical thinking. In addition, we all are first human beings with emotional reactions and sentiments and then intellectuals. In situations described by Prof and importantly, the fourth context, the first signal is human sentiment in defence of one's identity or ideological affinity. It is after a careful calculation or consideration that neutral view or opinion comes up. This means, we often put the cart before the horse. The question then is how many people can take time to consider all angles in the face of an assumed attack?
The moral here is that this is a call to take cues from the American post election style of convergence for the development of the nation because the growth of a nation implicates the tribes and groups.
Best wishes
Ofure

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Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Don Ohadike: Ten Years After

A life in retrospect is a life worth living. 

Prof. Segun Ogungbemi

On Aug 28, 2015, at 8:11 PM, Toyin Falola <toyinfalola@austin.utexas.edu> wrote:

Don Ohadike: Ten Years After


By Toyin Falola

Ezigbo Nnanyi Anyi Funanya

I will always miss my great friend.

Today marks the tenth year that we lost Professor Don Ohadike, an outstanding scholar who acquired a tremendous reputation in African history, one of the very best in the field of resistance to colonial rule in south-eastern Nigeria and the social history of the Igbo of West Africa.  A man of grace, wit, and kindness, he cultivated the affection and friendship of a large number of people, from the Gambia to the Cameroon. Always smiling and unruffled, he took criticisms very lightly, and his large heart never remembered a past conflict. His book, The Ekumeku Movement, is an impressive analysis of resistance to colonial rule in south-eastern Nigeria, one that broadens the discourse on resistance in general through fresh data, original interpretations, and a conclusion that previous scholars have made an error by assuming that resistance was limited to large African groups. He laid the foundation of what we now call Anioma Studies, with hisAnioma: A Social History of the Western Igbo People --the very first to explore how a dynamic group was able to navigate change at a most dramatic period in their history. This book has created a vigorous Anioma identity, propelled further by the work of the late Dr. Kurinum Osia. The lot fell on me to bring into completion his final bookSacred Drums of Liberation: Religions and Music of Resistance in Africa and the African Diaspora, a careful work that links culture with resistance.


In a note to me early this morning, his brilliant and committed daughter, Sandra Ohadike, wrote:

Today we think of you with love but that is nothing new
Today we give thanks to the Lord for blessing us with a Dad like you
Today we give thanks for your life and for the lives you've touched
Today we give thanks for the foundation you've set forth  

We thank you for showing us what unconditional love feels like
We thank you for your encouragement and for believing in us
We thank you for teaching us the importance of family/friendship and generosity 
We thank you for showing us how to work hard and still enjoy life

Thank you Dad for a great childhood and wonderful memories
Your legacy Lives on

Today we would not cry but we will have a glass (or two) of cognac in your honour; while listening to B.B. King and later watch reruns of the Jerry Springer Show. We will share stories, tell jokes and laugh out loud to honour the beautiful human being God blessed us with... 

Your memory is our keepsake with which we will never part
God has you in His keeping we have you in our hearts. 

We Thank GOD for you 

 

  

Don is well and alive in our memories and libraries.

Toyin Falola


Toyin Falola
Department of History
The University of Texas at Austin
104 Inner Campus Drive
Austin, TX 78712-0220
USA
512 475 7224
512 475 7222 (fax)

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USA Africa Dialogue Series - Change has come! How far has the president come in bring back OUR CHIBOK GIRLS?

He cannot do or be expected to do the impossible, so , facing reality is the question : Can the Chibok Girls be (physically) brought back ?  Is it possible? When? Nobody knows.

OK, so Nigeria is going to start manufacturing its own weapons (and will continue to import the more sophisticated stuff, and then there's the matter of maintenance. In no time at all new weapons soon become obsolete. Weapons of mass destruction? Never! About that all enemies agree.

Boko Haram has pledged allegiance to the Islamic State's Caliph Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi who wants to make Baghdad the capital of his Islamic Empire.

Question : Can one be a good citizen of Nigeria and simultaneously pledge allegiance to some Arab guy , cutting people's throats over there in Iraq and Syria, a terrorist who wants to get his tentacles on Baghdad? Had we better leave that to the political analysts to sort out?

Another type of loyalty is  the best kind of loyalty : Loyalty to the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, the God of the nation of Israel and - of course to the people of Israel, sometimes conflated with loyalty to whoever is doing the bombing…

It's Dreyfus all over again: one arrives at this conclusion after digesting this news item:

The 10 most anti-Semitic countries (As you may have noticed, Iran does not make it to the top ten…)

If we live long enough, in time we will witness compilations of e.g.

"The ten most racist countries in the world"

and

"The Special League of Blood suckers!"

It was a dismal report about the Chibok Girls in this morning's Stockholm Metro newspaper:

Expert: Hope for abducted girls fades :

"It has now been 500 days since the 276 Nigerian schoolgirls were abducted by the terrorist group Boko Haram.  Relatives hope to get them back, but according to a Nigerian security expert  there is no hope out there.

It was in the city Chibok in the state of Borno that the Islamist Boko Haram raided a school and forcibly took 276 girls  with them, in April last year.

57 of them managed to escape.  The rest of them appeared a month later in a video clip, dressed in Muslim clothing, reciting the Quran.  Since then, nobody has heard from them, but according to the Boko Haram leader Abubakar Shekau they have all converted to Islam and been married off.

The girls' relatives have pinned their hopes on the newly appointed President Muhammadu Buhari and his pledge to crush Boko Haram.

 - He has given us his word that he will do everything he can to save the girls, says Aisha Yesufu, spokesperson for the campaign "Give us our girls back."

 But according to the Nigerian security analyst and Boko Haram expert Fulan Nasrullah there is "no hope" for the girls.  Those who have not been killed in the escape attempt or air attacks against the camps where they have been held, have met many brutal fates.

 - Most of them have had children by now and married to their captors.  Many have been sold in the global sex trade, and are likely prostitutes in Sudan, Dubai, Cairo and other places far away, says Fulan Nasrullah.

 Nigeria AFP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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