Sunday, August 20, 2017

Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - ASUU: Moderator's Caution

In response to the stage this recurring discussion of years has reached on this group, there is so much I would like to say about the role of the Nigerian university system in my life, in terms of the tension between the ideal and the actual.

In my time as an academic within that system, I demonstrated, through my own actions, aspects of what was good and bad about the system, as well as being a victim of the bad.

I was compelled to go  university through a combination of force and persuasion enabled by my long suffering mother and friends I made in the course of my family's resolve to compel me to attend  university.

 I saw and largely still see the globally dominant  educational system, of which the Nigerian system in its philosophical foundations and methods is a subset, as an escapist response to the fundamental challenge of the quest for meaning that defines human existence, an escapism ignoring the imperative of seeking to know or at least respond reflexively to the fact of being travelers on a journey of which the purpose is unknown, the point of entry on the journey little understood   and its time of proximate termination and  cessation or  continuation from that point  unknown, preferring instead to dally attention on incidental issues emerging in the course of the journey, forgetting the larger picture.

In the light of that fundamental philosophical failure represented by the foundations of the educational system, a failure arising from social and epistemic tensions in the culture where this educational system originated, the  West's inability to develop a broadly appealing alternative to the strictures of religious culture it had escaped through the Scientific Revolution, the Reformation, the Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution, I resolved to educate myself, beginning in a grounding in comparative religion and philosophy, centred in practice of spiritual disciplines in order to penetrate to the metaphysical core of existence.

I wonder how I expressed these ideas as a teenager in Benin-City with only a secondary school formal education feasting voraciously on books in his family's library.It made little sense to most people. My sister, three years younger than me, later on in life described  my articulations on this subject at that time as sounding to her as  intelligent but meaningless.Some other people saw me as needing psychiatric attention.

I stop here. If I write further, I might never post because I will not be able to gather the energy to edit the resulting larger text. The subject brings up a complex of responses I need to sift through.

I close, though, in recalling those lecturers in my BA in the Department of English and Literature at the University of Benin who, through tireless efforts with struggling resources,   brought out the best in a system which I still consider significantly, if not profoundly inadequate, even in its global expression.

thanks

toyin


On 21 August 2017 at 02:27, 'Malami buba' via USA Africa Dialogue Series <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com> wrote:
TF,
It's a different kind of aspiration with academic life, I think. If you keep at it, and go through its rigour, the best essay and a good lecture are part of its spending money. And N500k in Sokoto, for example, is not a bad wage for the level of exertion demanded of us! 

The trick, I think, is to have a significant number of good people, who nurture and channel aspirations into a different but equally fulfilling pathway. At 17, Prof Shehu Galadanci was my VC and role model. As a student, then, I used to stand very close to his parking space to catch a glimpse of the great man. He didn't know this then. He knows now. Collette Clarke introduced me to Hamidou Kane and Albert Memmi, Late Dr Shehu  Lawal forced us to buy Fanon and Rodney after our first History lecture, at which he asked all of us to 'keep our religion outside', and so on. 

Fast forward today, Aspirations and inspirations of my junior colleagues are outside, in spite of our continuing presence (and relative success) inside. In that sense, we've all failed by our inability to pursuade colleagues and former students that there's more to life than 'a meal ticket'. 

On the other hand, most of the VCs I know now cannot match Galadanci's humility, presence and straight back at 80+!  And I'm sure you know many of your friends and former mentees who possessed all the bounties in 4 … and  counting … 

I may be wrong.

Malami
 

On 20 Aug 2017, at 18:36, Toyin Falola <toyinfalola@austin.utexas.edu> wrote:

Malami:
I need your help
1. Can you stop a lecturer not to aspire to own a jeep and a big house?
2. How did this aspiration emerge? Can we say the Unions created them?
3. Once one buys into those aspirations, where does the money come from?
4. Is the successful lecturer the one who writes the best essays and teaches with dedication or the one who sources for the jeep and the big house? 
TF

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 20, 2017, at 8:50 AM, 'Malami buba' via USA Africa Dialogue Series <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com> wrote:

Dear Moses et al,
It helps to spread the net a bit wider, and you'll find at the centre of this continuum/cycle of degeneracy a failed society/system. Its capacity for self-harm is only matched by its ill-will towards decent men and women.

You'll be surprised at the number of VCs, who became, for example,  ministers and MDA CEOs - after a lifetime of student activism and ASUU conradeship in the precious decades. As students, they led local and national unions with the (financial) backing of state and national governments. As academics, they turn their attention to the 'big picture', in order to deflect our attention from massive local frauds and other illegalities. Rare is a union leader who raises specific local  problems of staff and students with the VC (the one and only management that counts)! 

You can now begin to see the connection between the various crumbling structures of a failing society at all levels. Local cases of sexual harassment, cash-for-answers, contract inflation and forgeries are too close to the authorities, i.e student leaders, union leaders, the VC and ultimately the power brokers in the locality where the university is situated. Add the damage of zero perks to agitating staff and the picture of a union  of malfunction becomes perfectly formed! 

In my experience, the election of  a 'rougue' union leader, whose focus is the local issue of academic malaise and adminstrative incompetence is as rare as the metaphoric Hausa hab'o 'nosebleed'. Reforming this incestuous (your word, Moses) and incapacitating system requires the election and appointment of local 'nosebleeders'; but with Union leaders, who are also heads of departments and chief imams, there's a long, long way to go! 

(I know, because I am here, and have been (on/off) for more than three decades!)

Malami

On 19 Aug 2017, at 22:55, Moses Ebe Ochonu <meochonu@gmail.com> wrote:

Oga moderator, are you saying that the ills of the Nigerian academy that we have been outlining are products of larger societal forces? If so, is that not a cop out and a recipe for inertia and helplessness? Do we wait until these larger forces are extirpated before we expect or demand better from ASUU and its members? That would be music to ASUU's ears. It would also amount to exculpatory pandering to our colleagues in Nigeria. Perhaps before your important questions come into play, we need to first persuade our colleagues to take responsibility, hold themselves accountable, acknowledge the enormity of the rot beyond the familiar rhetoric of funding, and quit being defensive.

Not sure I get the logic of the reference to Senators and the police. Are we wrong to expect that academics who write tomes criticizing the excesses of the two groups should do much better in their professional lives and in their obligations than those they criticize?

And what is odd is that many of our Nigeria-based colleagues seem to have two separate scripts on these problems, one private and one public. It is understandable, but it still rankles. In private, the defensiveness gives way to brutal honesty. You know this as well as I do. I guess their attitude is analogous to your "don't empower our enemies" and "don't ruin the chances of the honest ones who want to apply to things on this side of the water."

On Sat, Aug 19, 2017 at 3:45 PM, Toyin Falola <toyinfalola@austin.utexas.edu> wrote:

Small  questions for you to move the argument forward:

1.  What forces and processes create values and habits that we find disturbing?

For instance, what forces produced the Senators we dislike, and the police that take bribes from us? How do we unleash counter forces and processes to eliminate those things? Why are you not asking me and you to do the reform?

2.  Can an institution, as in the police, reform itself or does it require greater forces outside of it to reform it?

3.  Can the abnormal not become the new normal if 2 does not occur?

TF

 

From: dialogue <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com> on behalf of Shola Adenekan <sholaadenekan@gmail.com>
Reply-To: dialogue <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com>
Date: Saturday, August 19, 2017 at 1:29 PM
To: dialogue <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com>


Subject: Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - ASUU: Moderator's Caution

 

Prof Aderibigbe, you said "Why don't we all go back home take over from the "never do good" Nigerian ASSU members and live happily thereafter and forever. Just a thought!" If I have a dollar for every time someone gave that response with regards to debates about ASUU's strike actions, I'll probably be a (US) dollar millionaire by now.

 

With due respect, what you wrote  above is a cheap shot. What people like Moses and I are advocating for is actually what we advocate for in Europe and America, which is that it is the duty of academia to be the guiding lighting for societies. It is our job to speak truth to power. What we call for is that ASUU needs to take a closer look at itself and examines its imperfections. University teachers should of course, be well-paid but earnings should be deserved. 

 

ASUU will get its members the pay-rise it is asking for, but what then? Will ASUU fight  the culture of nepotism within its rank? Will it tackle sexual harassment of students (https://www.jstor.org/stable/24487380?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents)? Will it address the frequent intimidation of junior colleagues and students(http://www.vanguardngr.com/2016/11/students-lament-compulsory-handouts-tertiary-institutions/) ? And what about corruption within the university system (http://www.gamji.com/article6000/news7987.htm)?

 

 

Shola

 

 

 

On 19 August 2017 at 21:33, Ibigbolade Aderibigbe <gbolaade.aderibigbe@gmail.com> wrote:

On a comic NOTE Why don't we all go back home take over from the "never do good" Nigerian ASSU members and live happily thereafter and forever. Just a thought!!!!

 

On Sat, Aug 19, 2017 at 2:09 PM, Moses Ochonu <meochonu@gmail.com> wrote:

Nothing right wing about calling out the disruptive  antics of a tactically outmoded union, or highlighting the failings and hypocrisies of its members. Nothing exhibitionist about calling for introspection on the part of conceited colleagues or advocating on behalf of students and parents. Protecting the careers of that honest academic who wants to study in Canada is not as important as protecting the interests of abused, neglected, and poorly instructed students. Those who glibly patronize and justify mediocrity need to take a look in the mirror and recognize their complicity in a rot from which they are safely protected.

Sent from my iPhone


On Aug 19, 2017, at 12:28 PM, Emeagwali, Gloria (History) <emeagwali@ccsu.edu> wrote:

 

"We must always criticize, even express anger, but we must strike the balance, protecting those who do honest work in a difficult environment. And we must be aware that what we say can undercut the application of an innocent woman or man to a school in Canada."

 

 

Agreed.  Well said.  It also throws a shadow on a generation of Nigerian academics -  and not only students.

Don't feed the beast  through exaggerated, self-righteous,  rightwing, intellectual exhibitionism.

 

 

 

 

Professor Gloria Emeagwali
 www.africahistory.net

Gloria Emeagwali's Documentaries on

Africa and the African Diaspora

8608322815  Phone

 


From: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com> on behalf of Abdul Salau <salauabdul@gmail.com>
Sent: Thursday, August 17, 2017 4:24 PM
To: toyin
Subject: Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - ASUU: Moderator's Caution

 

     
 

Any movement which adopts as its beginning compromise is doomed.

 

" The whole history of the progress of human liberty shows that all concessions yet made to her august claims have been born of earnest struggle. The conflict has been exciting, agitating, all-absorbing, and for the time being, putting all other tumults to silence. It must do this or it does nothing. If there is no struggle there is no progress. Those who profess to favor freedom and yet deprecate agitation are men who want crops without plowing up the ground; they want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean without the awful roar of its many waters.

This struggle may be a moral one, or it may be a physical one, and it may be both moral and physical, but it must be a struggle. Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. Find out just what any people will quietly submit to and you have found out the exact measure of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them, and these will continue till they are resisted with either words or blows, or with both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress.  "Frederick Douglass

 

Education just like other institutions in Nigeria such as marriage, family, health care, security, governance, and justice are dead..  What happened is that everybody is feeding on the dead bodies of these educational institutions.    Certain people with material and class interests are pleading for peace.  Where are the people advocating for peace for students, parents, and our country that has been abused and trampled upon by people without human compassion. Education was the first institutional infrastructure that was destroyed before other infrastructures collapsed on top of it.  Education is the foundation which all other things are built upon when it is destroyed symbols of its destruction are everywhere for people to see.   Evidence of the destruct ions are everywhere violence among youths, plights of migrants, kidnapping, corruption of political classes, judges, lawyers,  secession demands, religious fanaticism, ignorance, and anti-intellectualism of youths without socialization which  educational institutions provide. 

 

At this critical juncture when the leadership of ASUU is needed to train and socialize these youths to use their critical capacities to deal with problems confronting us as a nation.   Putting millions of youth out of universities at this time is a recipe for disaster at the highest scale.

 

On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 1:15 PM, Ibrahim Abdullah <ibdullah@gmail.com> wrote:

Difficult to caution discordant voices when things are beyond the pale. Let those who want to grieve do so. This is not a Nigerian problem; it is as global as education is the means to get things right.

 

And that globality is amplified even as the discordant and other voices compete for space in an unending conversation about where we wanna be!

---

Sent from my iPhone


On Aug 17, 2017, at 5:33 PM, Jibrin Ibrahim <jibrinibrahim891@gmail.com> wrote:

Thanks Toyin for your words of caution on our choice of words:

 

"We must always criticize, even express anger, but we must strike the balance, protecting those who do honest work in a difficult environment. And we must be aware that what we say can undercut the application of an innocent woman or man to a school in Canada."


Professor Jibrin Ibrahim

Senior Fellow

Centre for Democracy and Development, Abuja

Follow me on twitter @jibrinibrahim17

 

On 17 August 2017 at 17:09, Toyin Falola <toyinfalola@austin.utexas.edu> wrote:

Great friends:

 

Regarding ASUU, and the Nigerian university system, we must be very careful of the words we choose in presenting our disagreements. Words must always elevate, and criticisms must always be measured. Calling our colleagues corrupt, fake professors, rogues, sexual predators, harassers etc. etc., I think, represent word choices that we must not use, certainly not as an umbrella for all people. Our freedom stops where that of another person begins!

 

Our young men and women are mobile: they apply to graduate schools from London to Malaysia, Edmonton to Austin. We want them to grow, and this must be our mission. We want them to receive good education, and we must always protect their future. We cannot tarnish hard workers, honest school teachers who do their work diligently, and think that change will come. Let us identify the misfits and crucify them, but let us not lump the diligent with the corrupt.

 

From Cheikh Anta Diop University in Dakar to the University of Malawi, I have seen my colleagues carrying 200 scripts to grade—and better believe this, I even requested to join them in grading where the system allows me to. I use Skype to teach for free. The work is hard and difficult for some of  our colleagues, and we must not use words that will torment them. Our words must recognize their contributions to the continent. We are all in the space of underdevelopment, irrespective of our location.

 

Let me tell you personal stories. There is a lady that is based in Michigan State at the moment who narrated how one book that Ken Harrow gave her was decisive in launching her PhD program. I listened to the story and became emotional.  I once met yet another at the Nkrumah museum in Accra, and with three books that I sent to her, she was spurred and she wrote a statement for a PhD admission. She is writing the final chapter of her PhD in a top British university.

 

Nothing is wrong with our brains—it is our resources and how we allocate them that something is wrong with. Let us do small things. Our values may be compromised, against the background of globalization, failed modernity, and incoherent capitalism, but values are never stable—Saul became Paul!

 

We must always criticize, even express anger, but we must strike the balance, protecting those who do honest work in a difficult environment. And we must be aware that what we say can undercut the application of an innocent woman or man to a school in Canada.

 

TF

 

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Regards,

Dr. Shola Adenekan

African Literature and Cultures

University of Bremen

 

Editor/Publisher:
The New Black Magazine - http://www.thenewblackmagazine.com

 

 

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Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Is University of Ilorin a Model ofUniversity Governance or a Free-Rider of the Fruits of ASUU's Struggles?

And now, this.....

Academics' union banned over strike on unpaid salaries


As it embarks on an indefinite nationwide strike over what it claims are unfulfilled government promises, the Academic Staff Union of Universities, or ASUU, is reeling from a ban imposed on its local branch based at Kogi State University.

Because the outlawing of any branch of ASUU by implication means proscription of the entire union, the union leadership, including the Nigeria Labour Congress, has mapped out strategies to contest the decree, which includes challenging it in court. 

The ban – which was to come into effect immediately – was announced by University Visitor and Governor of Kogi State Yahaya Bello after an emergency meeting of the Executive Council of Kogi State on 19 July in response to a strike by academic staff over non-payment of salaries and lack of funding for teaching and research.

Bello said the decision became necessary as "all efforts to make the academic teachers call off their six-month-old strike failed. I personally undertook a tour of all tertiary institutions in Kogi State with a view to having first-hand knowledge about the problems in these institutions. While others have since returned to work, the academic staff refused to call off their strike action." 

Teachers ordered back to work

He said the government had fulfilled over 90% of the union's demands and had gone "one step further" by paying all outstanding salaries. He ordered striking teachers back to work, failing which they should consider themselves out of a job. 

"I have directed the governing council of the university to ensure that any staff [member] willing to work does not suffer any form of harassment nor intimidation," he said. 

At a later press conference in Abuja, Nigeria's federal capital, Bello said he had no regrets outlawing the union in the university. "The most important thing is the preservation of Kogi State University … I am concerned about the future of our children and that of the students. As long as we can protect it, I don't think I have any apologies for proscribing ASUU," he said. 

He told journalists that he had inherited a comatose university and was determined to resuscitate this institution.

"We need to carry out certain surgical operations in order to make the educational sector healthy and robust in Kogi State. Now, ASUU and several other bodies came up with certain demands. Some of these demands pre-dated my administration. And to the best of our judgement, as an administration, we were able to meet about 90% of these demands. 

"In a collective bargaining culture, both parties should shift ground. And the way and manner ASUU was going about these demands is more or less like an opposition political party."

Bello claimed that there were clandestine political forces aiding and abetting academic staff in their quest to cripple the university. 

"Apparently, there are certain forces from certain areas that are behind them. We shall deal with them at the appropriate time. As a visitor of that institution, I am empowered to proscribe the union so that we can have a smooth academic programme," he said. 

Job advertisements

The fiat was followed a few days later by an advert placed by the governing council in some of the national daily newspapers advertising staff vacancies in virtually all the academic departments. 

In response, several academics in the university and on other campuses have castigated the governor as an "un-serious comedian". 

Dr Wale Suenu, vice-chairman of ASUU at Lagos State University, said there was an acute shortage of academic staff in the university system because during the military era the postgraduate programmes were deliberately underfunded. 

"Who would go and teach in Kogi State University where salaries are not regular and teaching and research tools are absent? I agree with my colleagues who nicknamed Yahaya Bello an un-serious comedian".

Ayuba Wabba, president of the Nigeria Labour Congress, warned that Bello had no powers to ban any union. 

"Nigeria operates in terms of the rule of law. Thus Yahaya Bello has no power to proscribe ASUU … Workers have fundamental rights to join unions of their choice as enshrined in the charters of the United Nations and the International Labour Organization to which Nigeria is a signatory. 

"It is also the right of Nigerian workers to belong to any union of their choice as contained in Section 40 of Nigeria's Constitution. The constitution recognises Yahaya Bello as a duly elected executive governor of the state. The same constitution recognises that there are trade unions which are not under the governor's command. It is an independent entity that cannot be determined by the governor," said Wabba. 

Rights of union members

This was confirmed by barrister Eze Onyekpere who said the ban violates the rights of union members.

"The decision of the Kogi State Governor to proscribe the union has serious legal implications. Since it is the right of workers to come together under one legal umbrella, any suppression of any of the branches of ASUU is a clear violation of the human and trade union rights granted to its members by law … The decision of the governor is … an attempt to send the institution into extinction and in the process jeopardise the future of the students," he said. 

ASUU National President Professor Biodun Ogunyemi urged the governor to rescind the decision, announcing that the ASUU national executive council had ordered the Kogi State University chapter to proceed with the indefinite strike until the ban is lifted. This would be the sine qua non condition for dialogue between the governor and the leadership of the local branch, he said. 


On Sat, Aug 19, 2017 at 6:07 PM, Emeagwali, Gloria (History) <emeagwali@ccsu.edu> wrote:

Points noted.


BTW,   your guy is  &^#(*@.


My guy is #%@&*


There is a difference!😊
Ha Ha!




Professor Gloria Emeagwali
Gloria Emeagwali's Documentaries on
Africa and the African Diaspora
8608322815  Phone



From: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com> on behalf of Mobolaji Aluko <alukome@gmail.com>
Sent: Saturday, August 19, 2017 2:53 PM
To: USAAfrica Dialogue

Subject: Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Is University of Ilorin a Model ofUniversity Governance or a Free-Rider of the Fruits of ASUU's Struggles?
 


Gloria:

Are you, for example, suggesting that those who did not wish to become free during slavery - because they feared how they would survive without "massa" - should not have accepted freedom when slavery was abolished?

I don't believe so.

The right/freedom of association also has in it the right/freedom NOT to associate.  If the rules of the day state that those who do not pay union dues are not entitled to the benefits of union activity, then you would not have the opportunity to call the conscientious objector an &^#(*@.   Rather you would call him a fool for obtaining lower wages and higher teaching load than union members! Otherwise, his fundamental human right is being questioned.

I believe that for union membership, the proper method is for potential members  should be allowed  to OPT IN, not to OPT OUT.  That is, check off should not be automatic.

I never joined AAUP in my 27 years as an academic in the US, and would not have been an ASUU member in Nigeria.


Bolaji Aluko



On Sat, Aug 19, 2017 at 6:10 PM, Emeagwali, Gloria (History) <emeagwali@ccsu.edu> wrote:

This is a question we raised when one faculty member decided not to contribute union dues,

 but comfortably continued to enjoy the benefits accrued from academic unionism. He enjoyed a lower course load,

 a fixed percentage increase in salary that the union negotiated,  and   successful  security in terms of tenure but the #%@&*

continued to lambast the union and withhold financial contributions. I am referring to the AAUP not ASUU.


Crass and shameless opportunism indeed.




Professor Gloria Emeagwali
Professor of History
History Department
Central Connecticut State University
1615 Stanley Street
 
New Britain. CT 06050
www.africahistory.net
Gloria Emeagwali's Documentaries on
Africa and the African Diaspora
8608322815  Phone



From: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com> on behalf of Olayinka Agbetuyi <yagbetuyi@hotmail.com>
Sent: Friday, August 18, 2017 6:53 PM
To: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com
Cc: Olayinka Agbetuyi

Subject: Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Is University of Ilorin a Model ofUniversity Governance or a Free-Rider of the Fruits of ASUU's Struggles?
 
Beyond the 'order' is the question: can a university choose not to be a member of ASUU yet have resolutions successfully championed by the body implemented on such campus?  Isnt that crass  and shameless  opportunism?



Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.


-------- Original message --------
From: 'H O' via USA Africa Dialogue Series <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com>
Date: 18/08/2017 22:17 (GMT+00:00)
To: 'Michael Afolayan' via USA Africa Dialogue Series <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com>
Subject: Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Is University of Ilorin a Model ofUniversity  Governance or a Free-Rider of the Fruits of ASUU's Struggles?

Boxbe This message is eligible for Automatic Cleanup! (usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com) Add cleanup rule | More info
Dear Colleagues
Of ignorance, there are certain pleasures which only the ignorant knows; in madness lies certain pleasures which only the man knows. I do not covet life in an academy whose terrain incarnates life in the barrack; I pooh pooh whatever 'glory' or promise that it offers, that university where freedom of dissent has been sacrificed on the guillotine of patronage. I chose the word patronage in its unlimited semiotic possibilities.  


Oladosu A. Afis
Professor of Middle Eastern, North African and Cultural Studies
Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies,
University of Ibadan,
Ibadan, Nigeria.
"The best of princes is he who visits scholars."
- Jalal al-Din Rumi, 13th century Persian Sufi poet




On Friday, August 18, 2017, 9:39:52 PM GMT+1, H O <afism3@yahoo.com> wrote:


Dear Colleagues
Of ignorance, there are certain pleasures which only the ignorant knows; in madness lies certain pleasures which only the man knows. I do not covet life in an academy whose terrain incarnates life in the barrack; I pooh pooh whatever 'glory' or promise that it offers, that university where freedom of dissent has been sacrificed on the guillotine of patronage. I chose the word patronage in its unlimited semiotic possibilities.  

Oladosu A. Afis
Professor of Middle Eastern, North African and Cultural Studies
Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies,
University of Ibadan,
Ibadan, Nigeria.
"The best of princes is he who visits scholars."
- Jalal al-Din Rumi, 13th century Persian Sufi poet




On Friday, August 18, 2017, 7:04:17 PM GMT+1, 'Michael Afolayan' via USA Africa Dialogue Series <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com> wrote:


Of course, the choice is clear, and I know you've made it before asking. Dismissable as illusions and delusions of grandeur, such requests have no place on this side of the great divide. Scholarship cannot become a weapon of castigation for dissenting adult colleagues. Besides, this is America, even the president of the university cannot refrain anyone from attending a conference on his/her campus, let alone the leadership of a union. After all, there is an overarching, call it sacred, First Amendment clause that would bloody-nose a paternalistic individual in power who thinks s/he could wave the magic wand and forbid subordinates from exercising their rights. Nothing to debate here, folks; such request is out of order!

MOA






On Thursday, August 17, 2017 7:16 PM, Toyin Falola <toyinfalola@austin.utexas.edu> wrote:


A small addition without my opinion at this time:

I am hosting a conference in October and I was told not to accept the papers of anyone from the University of Ilorin as ASUU has banned folks from there from showing up in view of their non participation in the Union. I was asked to remove them, as if I don't the conference can be disrupted. I am seeking information on this.
TF

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 17, 2017, at 5:07 PM, Okey Iheduru <okeyiheduru@gmail.com> wrote:

Dear All:

1. "The factional Chairman, ASUU, Unilorin,  Dr. Usman Raheem, whose faction is recognised by the Unilorin management, said the branch did not join the strike as it had not been part of the national ASUU since 2001. He alleged that ASUU national did not also inform the branch of the strikeHe, however, said the branch was in support of the reason for the strike and urged the Federal Government to honour the agreement it reached with ASUU since 2009."

2.  "non participation of UNILORIN in all strikes called by ASUU has been responsible for the unbroken academic calendar and peace we have on campus in the last 16 years." ---Unilorin's Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic) Prof Sidikat Ijaya.

Could anyone who is familiar with the politics of Unilorin educate me on "what the heck is going on down there"? Due to scheduling conflict, I had to turn down an invitation to be on an accreditation panel at Unilorin in 2013 (and thus missed an opportunity to get a first-hand assessment) while I was on sabbatical in Nigeria. Is Unilorin different from the other campuses in terms of the unassailable criticisms and equally unassailable challenges facing academic staff, in particular, and higher education in Nigeria today, more generally?

Okey
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

UNILORIN, KWASU shun action

On:  August 16, 2017 In: NewsNews Update
As the strike called by the national body of the Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU) enters its second day today, lectures were on yesterday at the University of Ilorin (Unilorin).
In fact, most students of the university are putting finishing touches to their second semester examinations, it was gathered yesterday.
Yesterday, UNILORIN hosted an international conference organized by the Social Studies Association of Nigeria (SOSAN).
At the event, Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic) Prof Sidikat Ijaya, said she was at the conference because the university was not on strike.
Ijaya added "this non participation of UNILORIN in all strikes called by ASUU has been responsible for the unbroken academic calendar and peace we have on campus in the last 16 years."
The factional Chairman, ASUU, Unilorin,  Dr. Usman Raheem, whose faction is recognised by the Unilorin management, said the branch did not join the strike as it had not been part of the national ASUU since 2001. He alleged that ASUU national did not also inform the branch of the strike.
He, however, said the branch was in support of the reason for the strike and urged the Federal Government to honour the agreement it reached with ASUU since 2009.
Raheem said: "Unilorin is not observing the strike called by the national union of ASUU because of the reasons that are so obvious.
Since 2001, Unilorin has not been part of ASUU national and ASUU national has also been carrying its activities without us. The reasons for the strike and need for it were not communicated to us at Unllorin. So the referendum for whether it will hold or not in this university was not conducted because it was not communicated to us. So,  Unilorin academic staff are fully at work and we want to remain at work.
At KWASU,  It was observed that not all the students were in the campus as the school resumed academic activities on Monday  and  some of the students were yet to start attending lectures.
Both factional Chairmen of ASUU in KWASU, Dr. Adesola Dauda and Dr. Issa Abdulraheem said the branch did not join the strike.
Dauda, whose faction is recognised by the national body of ASUU, said it was observing the situation.
He said "ASUU national is on strike but KWASU is not on strike because we are on observer status. We have just joined ASUU and by their constitution we  have to observe.   We are on observe status. We have the capability to join, but I am still having problem with my university management. The university management does not want union to exist in KWASU."
Abdulraheeem, who is recognised by the KWASU management, said the strike was not  being observed.
The faction will have a congress today to inform the members why the faction will not embark on the strike.




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