Saturday, August 30, 2014

USA Africa Dialogue Series - Going back in time: African Writers Conference in Stockholm, 1986

Inevitably, much has changed, inevitably (tradition) much remains the same:

Criticism and Ideology:" Second African Writers' Conference in Stockholm, 1986

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Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - SCANDALOUS: Outrage in Nigeria as government brands National ID Card with MasterCard's logo

Obi,
It appears you did not read my blog with diligence and seriousness of reflection it demands. You did not bother to know what informed the Federal government to engage in something that removed the privacy of individual holders of the identity card. 
Some individuals are dubious and criminally minded, which the use of the card will fish out and will enable security agencies apprehend and bring them to justice. 
Those who oppose to the noble course of the identity card probably have some skeleton in their cupboards. 
Philosophy seeks to clarify issues with rational and logical arguments. It does not lend itself to frivolous issues that add no values to intellectualism and scholarship. 
There are other parameters of economic life of the nation one needs to bear in mind. The foreign reserve of Nigeria is in the financial custody of an organization in the US. Some of the giant oil companies exploring oil in Nigeria come from America and Europe. Most of the military weapons Nigeria has come from Europe and America. Tell us if your finances are so exposed to others as it is with Nigeria including your security, what kind of secrecy do you have?
It is important you mind your language when you contribute to an issue of public or national interest. 


Segun Ogungbemi Ph.D
Professor of Philosophy
Adekunle Ajasin University
Akungba-Akoko, Ondo State
Nigeria
Cellphone: 08033041371
                   08024670952

On Aug 30, 2014, at 4:36 PM, Rex Marinus <rexmarinus@hotmail.com> wrote:

Segun, the world is a "global village" eh? Maybe you should just back an overnight bag, buy a ticket at the airport and step into the US without a visa, and see how much a village the globe is. It is mere shibboleth. Because Great Britain and the US know your "secrets" in Nigeria, does not actually make the world "global." It just makes Nigeria stupid and Nigerians vulnerable. It is probably only the president of Nigeria that probably has a Google account with which he probably happily transacts official Nigerian business on-line too. You probably do not understand this, and you are a Professor of Philosophy no less, that a national population data is the sum of sovereign security. Whoever has control of that information tracks your desire - what you buy, where you buy, why you buy, and how you decide what to buy etc; as well indeed as your genetic health. That nations keep this data secret because information gathering mechanisms that target every aspect of your population footprint constitutes the basis of national intelligence. The great frontier of new wars of the century will be cyberwars and would be by simulation and remote control. It has not occurred to you, Professor of Philosophy, that acquiring the data of a sovereign nation is the first step towards its digital confinement or quarantining or triaging. And here I thought that Philosophy allows you to imagine, create scenarios, determine long-range outcome, and constitute the building block of ideas that serves a society. If advancements in Information Technology grants you access to the "secrets" of other nations, why don't you know the secrets of China or the US or Great Britain or India, or Iran, or Russia, or even Ghana? Why do such serious nations train cryptographers, and a new army of cyber warriors to protect their national secrets from cyber attacks? Why do we in fact have cyber attacks? Permit me, professor to say very respectfully, that for a Professor I think your innocence is less naivete than ignorance, and it is troubling.
Obi Nwakanma

 

Subject: Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - SCANDALOUS: Outrage in Nigeria as government brands National ID Card with MasterCard's logo
From: seguno2013@gmail.com
Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 10:13:02 +0100
To: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com

Gloria,
I understand your sentiments and those of your like mind. 
May I ask you: is there any security secret which Nigeria has that Britain and American governments do not know? 
The world is a global village and being so means that what we considered  a security secret and pride  of a 'nation' is known by most countries of the world. 
With the advancement of ICT, there seems to no secrecy as it used to be. 
A national ID card is a pride of anyone carrying it as an identification that she/he comes from a particular nation. 
Many of us have MasterCards or Visa-cards. Some fellow Nigerians have abused the use of these cards just as, perhaps, a handful of others from other countries. 
The companies that own these cards have databases just as the country from where they operate. Nigeria does not have any reliable database. The reason is not too far fetched- corruption. 
Do you know how many times our governments have tried to have the national cards for all Nigerians and it failed? Do you know how much it costs the nation?
You will all say it is bad leadership,  corruption and the weakness of the people in power to arrest and punish the offenders. It is easier said than done.  
Is there any arrest of people in high places made and it did not boil down to ethnicity or religious acrimony? At the end of the day no nobody is brought to justice. And if there is any, the raw arm of justice in the end will be arm twisted and the culprit is set free. 
My submission in all this is: why did Jonathan administration choose to use the new device? Let us get the facts before we condemn it. 
We should be more careful of insulting our President. He did not put himself there. 
We, the majority of Nigerians elected him and we must respect our choice and the office. 

Segun Ogungbemi Ph.D
Professor of Philosophy
Adekunle Ajasin University
Akungba-Akoko, Ondo State
Nigeria
Cellphone: 08033041371
                   08024670952

On Aug 30, 2014, at 3:56 AM, Tunde <tundeojo@hotmail.com> wrote:

Simply put, President Badluck is sick in the head. If this maddness stands, Nigeria will be the laughing stock of the world over. 
A man with a PHD???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

> From: emeagwali@mail.ccsu.edu
> To: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com
> CC: nigerianID@yahoogroups.com; NaijaObserver@yahoogroups.com; naijaintellects@googlegroups.com; talknaija@yahoogroups.com; naijanet@googlegroups.com
> Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 17:50:43 -0400
> Subject: RE: USA Africa Dialogue Series - SCANDALOUS: Outrage in Nigeria as government brands National ID Card with MasterCard's logo
>
> 'Do you expect them to miraculously mutate into a success story?' IBK
>
> Sometimes you can make lemonade with a lemon.
>
>
> Professor Gloria Emeagwali
> CT 06050
> africahistory.net
> vimeo.com/user5946750/videos
> Documentaries on Africa and the African Diaspora
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com [usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Ibukunolu A Babajide [ibk2005@gmail.com]
> Sent: Friday, August 29, 2014 5:05 PM
> To: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com
> Cc: nigerianID@yahoogroups.com; NaijaObserver@yahoogroups.com; naijaintellects@googlegroups.com; talknaija@yahoogroups.com; naijanet@googlegroups.com
> Subject: RE: USA Africa Dialogue Series - SCANDALOUS: Outrage in Nigeria as government brands National ID Card with MasterCard's logo
>
>
> Prof. Gloria Emegwali,
>
> Too little too late! Can Nigerians do this on their own? This shell of a country is just an extension of the Royal Niger Company.
>
> Concentrate on viable patriotic pursuits not this one where the alternative is perfect chaos. Have you not been reading Rotimi Ogunsuyi telling us all how useless GEJ &co. are? Do you expect them to miraculously mutate into a success story?
>
> No ma'am, it does not work like that.
>
> Cheers.
>
> IBK
>
> On 29 Aug 2014 23:36, "Emeagwali, Gloria (History)" <emeagwali@mail.ccsu.edu<mailto:emeagwali@mail.ccsu.edu>> wrote:
> Corruption. Someone is getting 10% .
> It is really scandalous and I am happy that people are reacting against it.
>
> It could also be linked to mass surveillance.
>
> It has the potential to
> create mass indebtedness too.
>
>
> Professor Gloria Emeagwali
> africahistory.net<http://africahistory.net>
> vimeo.com/user5946750/videos<http://vimeo.com/user5946750/videos>
> Documentaries on Africa and the African Diaspora
> ________________________________________
> From: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com<mailto:usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com> [usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com<mailto:usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com>] On Behalf Of Anunoby, Ogugua [AnunobyO@lincolnu.edu<mailto:AnunobyO@lincolnu.edu>]
> Sent: Friday, August 29, 2014 2:25 PM
> To: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com<mailto:usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com>; NaijaObserver@yahoogroups.com<mailto:NaijaObserver@yahoogroups.com>; naijaintellects@googlegroups.com<mailto:naijaintellects@googlegroups.com>; naijanet@googlegroups.com<mailto:naijanet@googlegroups.com>; nigerianID@yahoogroups.com<mailto:nigerianID@yahoogroups.com>; talknaija@yahoogroups.com<mailto:talknaija@yahoogroups.com>
> Subject: RE: USA Africa Dialogue Series - SCANDALOUS: Outrage in Nigeria as government brands National ID Card with MasterCard's logo
>
> What is going on I wonder.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com<mailto:usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com> [mailto:usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com<mailto:usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com>] On Behalf Of Kola Fabiyi
> Sent: Friday, August 29, 2014 6:28 AM
> To: NaijaObserver@yahoogroups.com<mailto:NaijaObserver@yahoogroups.com>; naijaintellects@googlegroups.com<mailto:naijaintellects@googlegroups.com>; naijanet@googlegroups.com<mailto:naijanet@googlegroups.com>; nigerianID@yahoogroups.com<mailto:nigerianID@yahoogroups.com>; usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com<mailto:usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com>; talknaija@yahoogroups.com<mailto:talknaija@yahoogroups.com>
> Subject: USA Africa Dialogue Series - SCANDALOUS: Outrage in Nigeria as government brands National ID Card with MasterCard's logo
>
> SCANDALOUS: Outrage in Nigeria as government brands National ID Card with MasterCard's logo
>
> Ini Ekott - Premium Times
>
>
> The new Nigerian National Identity Cards launched Thursday by President Goodluck Jonathan, with branded logo of the American firm, MasterCard, have sparked outrage across the country amid fears of serious security and economic breach, with many Nigerians calling for an immediate stoppage of the deal.
>
> Nigerians expressed shock and fury Thursday at how the Nigerian Government, through the National Identity Management Commission, NIMC, would surrender a symbol of national sovereignty and pride to a foreign commercial organisation by not only sharing the biometrics of 170 million Nigerian to the firm but by also allowing the firm to boldly engrave its insignia on the IDs.
>
> Many Nigerians raised the alarm over the implications of the agreement in an age that has seen intense data surveillance by the National Security Agency of the United States of America, Mastercard's home country.
> One commentator said allowing MasterCard's emblem on the Nigerian National ID Card could only compare to the trans-Atlantic slave trade abolished in the nineteenth century.
>
> "The new ID card with a MasterCard logo does not represent an identity of a Nigerian. It simply represents a stamped ownership of a Nigerian by an American company," said Shehu Sani of the Civil Rights Congress. "It is reminiscent of the logo pasted on the bodies of African salves transported across the Atlantic."
>
> At the launching Thursday, the Nigerian Identity Management Commission said the cards, designed to also allow handlers effect payments and other financial transactions, will be issued to 13 million Nigerians.
>
> At the completion of the pilot phase of the program, 100 million cards would have been issued, the commission said, describing the move as the "broadest financial inclusion program in Africa".
>
> The cards will be issued to Nigerians, 16 years and older, and are expected to serve as voting cards in the 2019 elections.
>
> President Jonathan, who flagged off the rollout, praised the outcome of a partnership between NIMC, MasterCard and Access Bank.
> "The card is not only a means of certifying your identity, but also a personal database repository and payment card, all in your pocket," Mr. Jonathan said.
>
> Under the partnership, the NIMC is the project leader, MasterCard provides payments technology, while Unified Payment Services Limited is paym ository and payment card, all in your pocket," Mr. Jonathan said.
>
> Under the partnership, the NIMC is the project leader, MasterCard provides payments technology, while Unified Payment Services Limited is payments processor. Cryptovision is the Public Key Infrastructure and Trust Services Provider, and the pilot issuing bank is Access Bank Plc.
>
> The Identity Management Commission said it was working with other government agencies to harmonize all identity databases including the Driver's License, Voter Registration, Health Insurance, Tax, SIM and the National Pension Commission into a single, shared services platform.
>
> For a National ID card project jinxed for decades due to corruption and mismanagement, Nigerians welcomed what seemed like a breakthrough this time, several years after the first attempt at a national Identity Card project ended in fiasco.
> But the optimism waned after it became clear Thursday the new ID cards, a key instrument recognised by the federal constitution, will not only bear the Coat of Arms and the Nigerian colours of green white green, but also the logo of MasterCard, a profit-driven private entity.
>
> "Nigeria's colours and coast of arms is what should be there. It is not an opportunity for advert for promoting companies," said Eze Onyekpere, Lead Director Centre for Social Justice. "As far as we are concerned it cannot stand. It is not worth it if that's what they have done."
>
> Beyond national pride, many Nigerians spoke of the dire economic and security implications for Nigeria.
> "Clearly, there are National Security implication," said Nasir El-Rufai, a former Minister of the Federal Capital Territory. "All these data go to the American payment platform."
> Mr. El-Rufai recalled that Malaysia was the first country to implement a general multipurpose ID card and that the country did so with its own resources and technology to protect its citizens.
>
> Economically, analysts say, the deal also hands over all adult Nigerians as direct and compulsory customers of MasterCard.
>
> The US-based firm appeared so elated at the outcome of the contract that by Thursday, it hired a media consultant, African Media Agency, to publicise the landmark deal all over the world.
>
> MasterCard could not be reached immediately for comments.
> Details of the partnership between the NIMC and MasterCard were unclear as of Friday.
>
> A former senior government official, well briefed about the process, said the Nigerian government may have adopted the Public Private Partnership model for the project, with MasterCard underwriting part of the cost of the deal.
>
> Still, the former official, who asked not to be named, said it was unbelievable that Nigeria could not insist on fully funding such a project at any cost, considering its strategic importance to its sovereignty.
>
> "It's so scandalous that there are countries you present this to and they will be confused," the official said. "I have never seen this done anywhere in the world."
>
> The Nigerian Identity Management Commission, NIMC, refused to comment on the concerns.
> When contacted by PREMIUM TIMES late Thursday, a spokesperson dismissed the concern raised by our reporter.
>
> "What is wrong with that (displaying MasterCard's logo on the IDs)?" asked Ben Alofoje, the Assistant Director/Head Research and Strategy, who is the designated media person for the project.
>
> A PREMIUM TIMES reader,Ola Onanugaola, said of the project, "Good idea but bad implementation. Why do we have to brand the e-ID card? Are these people aware of the huge economic and security implications of the branding.
>
> "Any country population database/information is too vital to attached to any non-governmental organisation."
>
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Re: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Half of a Yellow Sun - The movie...

Oga Ikhide,
Make I welcome you back first.

You're right about the movie. I've watched it three times now and each time, I have several questions, historical and cinematographical. The movie ought to enter into any curriculum on history and historiography of Nigeria. It is amazing! 

And we need many many more movies like this that unravels our history and predicament in a sytematic and engaging manner; movies that entertain you but raise reflective frowns. Kunle Afolayan has a similar one on the way, and it is provocatively titled "October 1."


Adeshina Afolayan


Sent from Samsung Mobile



-------- Original message --------
From: 'Ikhide' via USA Africa Dialogue Series <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com>
Date:
To: USAAfricaDialogue <usaafricadialogue@googlegroups.com>,Ederi Group <ederi@yahoogroups.com>,Krazitivity Group <krazitivity@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: USA Africa Dialogue Series - Half of a Yellow Sun - The movie...


Once upon a time, beautiful men and women rose as leaders to embrace the awesome promise of an emerging nation, Nigeria. They were poets and soldiers, intellectuals and doers who mesmerized the world with beautiful words and crisp uniforms – and proceeded to take the promise apart brick by brick with graft, incompetence and civil strife. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's epic novel Half of a Yellow Sun about Nigeria's anxieties and the ensuing civil war spoke to the heart of that broken promise in a unique and mesmerizing way. Half of a Yellow Sun is a beautiful book that should be required reading in every classroom, so that we may never forget. Many years ago, I was so taken by it, I wrote a cringe-worthy review in which I gushed aloud my hope that the book would be turned into a movie.
My prayers were answered, there is a movie and all I can say is that Biyi Bandele the movie director, who also wrote the script, did a great job, never mind the reviews. It is not a perfect movie, but it certainly entertained me. Let me just say that it is important for those who are interested in Nigeria's history to watch the movie. At the very least, this pretty movie is a conversation starter; you watch the movie and all these questions come rushing at you. You want answers. Nigeria is a nation that deleted history from its classrooms' curriculum. We need movies like this in each classroom so that children can rediscover the joy of being inquisitive.
 
 
- Ikhide
 
Stalk my blog at www.xokigbo.com
Follow me on Twitter: @ikhide
Join me on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ikhide


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